Oro Valley Real Estate - Getting Your Spring Garden to Grow

Have you ever dreamed of transforming your outdoor space into a beautiful garden, full of healthy plants and vegetables, but you're not quite sure where to start? A successful garden may not be as hard as it appears, and following these steps could lead to a bountiful garden and harvest!
Location, location, location. Just like in housing, selecting a great location can make all the difference. Choose an area with morning light and afternoon shade. Determining if your chosen plant needs full sun exposure or partial shade can lead to success.
Getting in the mix. You'll want to consider which soil you use, as well. Avoid heavy clays and sandy soils, as these don't make for good soil or improve soil structure. Make sure your soil has the right blend of organic matter and fertilizers in the soil before you begin planting. You can even consider raised beds or container gardening if good soil is not available.
Be the architect. You shouldn't start home remodeling without a plan, and the same is true for your garden. Make sure to plan where vegetables will be planted, leaving room for growing space between each plant. Also, choosing vegetables your family enjoys eating will please you and your picky eaters!
Do as the locals do. Select from a recommended list of plants that you know grow well locally in our region. Peppers, green beans, herbs, and tomatoes grow well in Arizona. Also, get to know your local suppliers. They can be a reputable source for seed and garden supply and can help ensure you get the correct seeds that will grow in our native habitat.
Don't forget to water. Due to sparse rainfall and desert conditions in the southwest, you will need to remember to water your garden. While some plants are use to little water, you will still need to water your plants enough to keep the soil moist from becoming dry.
Keep intruders at bay. Get rid of pesky weeds! Weeds in your garden will compete with your vegetables for water, nutrients, and light, so be sure to nip these guests in the bud. Mulching and cultivation can help combat the intrusion of weeds.
A winning combination. Some plants grow better when planted directly into the soil versus transplanting. The process of transplanting is when a seed starts somewhere else and is later planted in your garden. While transplanting can help speed up the process, certain plants do not do so well with this process. Consult your local garden resource to help determine the best course of action.
Happy harvesting! Peak vegetable freshness happens for a limited time, so keep an eye on your garden and be ready to harvest your hard work.
For more in-depth learning and quick-tips on how to best grow your garden, the University of Arizona's College of Agriculture and Life Sciences is an excellent local resource.